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Kindergarten children who engage in aggressive or impulsive behaviors, such as arguing or getting angry, are more likely to be bullied as they age, according to a new study led by a Penn State College of Education researcher.
Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan
Researchers at Penn State and the University of South Carolina have recently found that a program for parents of children recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows promising evidence of helping parents access services for their child, strengthening their co-parenting skills and contributing to their well-being overall.
Feinberg-Jones article image
Feinberg-Jones article image
"The Society for Child and Family Policy and Practice (Div. 37 of the American Psychological Association; formerly Div. 37: Child, Youth and Family Services) is committed to the application of psychological knowledge to advocacy, social justice, service delivery and public policies affecting children, youth and families in a diverse and inclusive society. The society advances research, education, training and practice through a multidisciplinary and culturally informed perspective. The society is interested in supporting culturally informed, evidence-based practice that promotes health equity with underserved and vulnerable populations."
Chad Shenk
Chad Shenk
The study aimed to provide a novel evaluation of adolescent sensitization to interparental conflict (IPC), which is thought to be a critical factor in understanding multifinality in risk outcomes.
Carlie Sloan
Carlie Sloan
BRIDGE is the Department of Psychology’s diversity action alliance, consisting of graduate students, faculty members, and staff. The purpose of BRIDGE is to promote and create an inclusive environment through education, social support, and advocacy within our departmental community.
Bridge Diversity Alliance
Bridge Diversity Alliance
Harry & Marion Royer Eberly Fellow and Professor of Education and Demography Paul Morgan is recognized as being among the top 1% of scientists in the world, according to a report from Elsevier BV and Stanford University.
CSC faculty affiliate Paul Morgan ranked among top 1% of researchers globally
The Society for Research on Adolescence held their biennial meeting March 3-5, 2022, in New Orleans, Louisiana.
CSC at SRA 2022
CSC at SRA 2022
We are pleased to announce the 2022 Strumpf Scholars: Tong Chen, a Developmental Psychology graduate student and Christina Hlutkowsky, a Child Clinical Psychology graduate student.
PSU Nittany Lion Statue
PSU Nittany Lion Statue
We are pleased to announce the 2022 Irene E. Harms Graduate Scholarship Award recipient: Chelsea Mayo, a Clinical Psychology graduate student.
PSU Nittany Lion Statue
PSU Nittany Lion Statue
This study used data from the Family Life Project, a longitudinal study of child development. It tested a three-way interaction in which positive parenting and learning materials in the home from age 6–36 months and family income predicted children's executive functioning at 58 months. It also tested whether this interaction predicted early school functioning, specifically behavioral and academic skills in the 1st grade.
Yolanda Murphy
Yolanda Murphy
Identifying people as unique individuals is critical for social interaction. While there are multiple sensory cues that facilitate person identification, visual information from the face is disproportionately useful for recognizing individual people.
Myles Arrington
Myles Arrington
New research from Penn State found that children with positive, early interactions with their care givers — characterized by warmth, responsiveness, and a stimulating home environment — were at reduced risk of childhood obesity.
Lori Francis
Lori Francis
It is often said that “children eat what they like,” but the results of a new study by Penn State nutritionists and sensory scientists suggests that when it comes to meals, it is more accurate and more relevant to say, “children do not eat what they dislike.”
Kathleen Keller
Kathleen Keller
To better understand the short-term impact of family interactions on adolescent sleep, this study examined daily associations between family interaction quality and sleep duration, sleep maintenance efficiency, and subjective sleep quality.
Sunhye Bai
Sunhye Bai
For nearly 20 years, Penn State Research Professor Mark Feinberg has been developing and sharing Family Foundations, a course for couples expecting their first child that focuses on how to work as a team, communicate and solve problems.
Mark Feinberg
Mark Feinberg
Family systems research has identified two key processes (spillover and compensatory), linking interparental relationship quality to the parent–child relationship. However, previous research has focused on the parent as the sole initiator and had not often considered the role of the child in these processes.
Amanda Ramos
Amanda Ramos
Attention biases to threat are considered part of the etiology of anxiety disorders. The dot probe task is frequently used to assess attention biases, however traditional bias scores may not be reliable. Attention bias variability (ABV) may better capture the relation between attention biases and psychopathology risk, versus mean levels of attention bias.
Kelley Gunther
Kelley Gunther
Congratulations to Dr. Douglas Teti on being named a Distinguished Professor by Penn State. Dr. Teti is a professor of human development and family studies, psychology and pediatrics, head of the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, and director of the Families at Risk initiative at the Child Study Center. He is a developmental scientist whose research is focused on family processes as they relate to infant and early child development.
Douglas M Teti
Douglas M Teti
Congratulations to Dr. Krista Wilkinson on being named a Distinguished Professor by Penn State. Dr. Wilkinson is a professor of communication sciences and disorders. She studies early communication and language in learners with developmental and intellectual disabilities.
Krista Wilkinson
Krista Wilkinson
Childhood sexual abuse can lead to depression, anxiety, cardiovascular disease and other health problems later in life. Not all abused children experience these problems, however, and researchers are working to understand whose health is affected and why.
Chad Shenk
Chad Shenk
Caffeine consumption has been linked to poor sleep health in adolescents, but it is unknown whether poor sleep predicts caffeine consumption, and/or whether caffeine consumption predicts poor sleep, particularly when sleep is measured objectively.
Orfeu Buxton
Orfeu Buxton
"...when the struggle of pandemic parenting is discussed, it is often focused on the needs of mothers. It is important, however, to not overlook the needs of single fathers—one of the fastest-growing populations in the country..."
Kate Guastaferro
Kate Guastaferro
A year has passed since COVID-19 began disrupting systems. Although children are not considered a risk population for the virus, there is accumulating knowledge regarding children's escalating risk for maltreatment during the pandemic.
Christian Connell
Christian Connell
Dr. Witherspoon's talk will focus on how human development can be understood in the context of place, an outgrowth of her NSF study, Neighborhoods and Development: New Approaches for a Changing America.
Dawn Witherspoon
Dawn Witherspoon
The effects of genetics, home environment, and prenatal substance use on child health and brain development are largely unknown, even though pregnancy and early childhood are incredibly important periods of growth. To address this knowledge gap, Penn State was recently awarded a five-year, $5.8 million grant and selected as part of a longitudinal NIH-funded consortium called the HEALthy Brain and Child Development (HBCD) Study.
Koraly Pérez-Edgar
Koraly Pérez-Edgar
A five-year training grant awarded to researchers in the Penn State College of Education will collaboratively prepare master’s degree candidates as special education teachers and school counselors with specialized expertise in trauma-informed services for students with disabilities.
Carlomagno Panlilio
Carlomagno Panlilio
Dick and Bebe Hayes have long been committed to supporting community engagement at the CSC and helping to translate foundational research into practices, programs, and policies that enhance the lives and well-being of at-risk children, youth, and families.
Richard & Young Mi Hayes
Richard & Young Mi Hayes
Research posters are essential for disseminating a student's work. Please take a moment to review our new gallery showcasing some of the important research taking place here at the Child Study Center.
Check out the new CSC gallery of student poster presentations!
The American Educational Research Association (AERA), a national research society, strives to advance knowledge about education, to encourage scholarly inquiry related to education, and to promote the use of research to improve education and serve the public good.
Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan
The purpose of this study was to examine whether individual differences in infant temperament could be predicted by a mother's level of hostility, a putative transdiagnostic vulnerability for psychopathology, substance use, and insensitive parenting (Eiden et al., Reference Eiden, Leonard, Colder, Homish, Schuetze and Huestis2011; Schuetze, Eiden, & Dombkowski, Reference Schuetze, Eiden and Dombkowski2006).
Brendan Ostlund
Brendan Ostlund
Filling half of a child’s plate with fruits and veggies isn’t just recommended by the United States Dietary Guidelines, it also helps increase the amount of produce that kids end up eating, according to Penn State research.
Kathleen Keller
Kathleen Keller
Few studies examine how neighborhood structural factors (e.g., socioeconomic status [SES] and diversity) and perceived disorder may influence the messages parents communicate to their youth about race/ethnicity. Guided by the integrative model and social disorganization theory, this study examines how parents' ethnic–racial socialization messages (ERS) are shaped by the broader environment.
Dawn Witherspoon
Dawn Witherspoon
The authors tested whether changes in eye blink rate during a naturalistic effortful control task differ as a function of parent-reported effortful control and internalizing behaviors.
Kelley Gunther
Kelley Gunther
Bilingual brains use a complex system of strategies to process language, but less is known about whether those who speak several dialects of the same language use similar processes.
Janet van Hell
Janet van Hell
For the past several years, there has been an ongoing partnership between Penn State researchers and government partners to change the Commonwealth's county-based child welfare system through legislative and policy actions. We spoke to Jennie Noll, Ph.D., Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network at Penn State University, and Brian Bornman, Esq., Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Children and Youth Administrators Association, about their collaborative process, the challenges of navigating a stressed bureaucratic system, and what the future holds for resolving issues of child welfare and maltreatment.
Jennie Noll
Jennie Noll
Karen Bierman, an Evan Pugh University Professor of Psychology and Human Development and Family Studies and director of the Child Study Center; Matt Ferrari, associate professor of biology and director of the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics; and Dr. Emily Link, internal medicine physician at Penn State Health, will answer viewers’ questions live on air.
Karen Bierman
Karen Bierman
Koraly Pérez-Edgar, McCourtney Professor of Child Studies, professor of psychology, and associate director of the Social Science Research Institute, was recently named editor-in-chief of Developmental Psychology, one of the flagship journals of the American Psychological Association.
Koraly Perez-Edgar
Koraly Perez-Edgar
The National Prevention Science Coalition to Improve Lives is pleased to provide this 40-page booklet of factsheets documenting evidence for structural racism across societal systems. Experts from a wide range of fields present data on the negative impacts of racist practices on the health and well-being of children and families, and recommend public policies to weed it out.
Diana Fishbein
Diana Fishbein
Early childhood is a critical period for the development of regulatory skills, which are shaped in the context of parent–child interactions (Kim & Kochanska, 2012; Scholtes et al., 2020).
Erika Lunkenheimer
Erika Lunkenheimer
Jordan Sigler, an honor student beginning her senior year under the mentorship of Dr. Suzy Scherf, is majoring in Psychology with minors in Neuroscience and Kinesiology.
Jordan Sigler
Jordan Sigler
The Penn State Postdoctoral Society annually awards an Outstanding Postdoctoral Scholar and an Outstanding Postdoctoral Mentor Award! Nominations are reviewed by panels of Penn State postdocs and faculty.
Janet van Hell
Janet van Hell
Yulia Lerner of Tel Aviv University, Suzanne Scherf of Pennsylvania State University, and colleagues looked at brain activity across the cortex in older adolescents, 15 to 19 years old, while watching the movie “Escape to Witch Mountain.”
Suzy Scherf
Suzy Scherf
Congratulations to Venus Ricks, M.Ed., former lab coordinator in Dr. Kristin Buss’ Emotion Development Lab, who was named the first ever Director of the newly created Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Office for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania!
Venus Ricks
Venus Ricks
Adolescence can be an emotionally turbulent time, but new research at Penn State found that close, supportive relationships with parents — especially dads — at key points during adolescence can help stave off certain adjustment problems.
Research by CSC faculty affiliates Gregory Fosco and Susan McHale found that closeness with parents during adolescence may help prevent common adjustment problems.
The faculty and staff of the CSC offer their sincere condolences to the family of Arnold “Arn” Hoffman, who passed away August 4th in Sarasota, FL.
Arnold Hoffman sitting on a bench
Arnold Hoffman sitting on a bench
In the past few decades, mental health experts and researchers have started to understand how ADHD manifests differently depending on gender, as girls tend to seem more inattentive and forgetful while boys tend to seem more hyperactive and disruptive. The reasons Black children and ethnic minorities are overlooked range from racial bias in schools and lack of access to care, to stigma and distrust of educators and health providers based on past discrimination.
Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan
The study sought to replicate prior research on the development of multicultural knowledge in undergraduate multicultural psychology courses and extend our understanding by also examining growth in ethnic identity as well as three potential moderators of growth in multicultural knowledge and ethnic identity: ethnoracial background of students, previous experience with multicultural courses, and participation in small-group discussions.
Dawn Witherspoon
Dawn Witherspoon
The Small Grants Program for Early Career Scholars addresses this need within developmental science by supporting pilot or small-scale research projects proposed by members who completed their doctoral degree within the last five years.
Sunhye Bai
Sunhye Bai
Paul Morgan, the Harry & Marion Eberly Faculty Fellow and professor of education (education theory and policy) in the Penn State College of Education, is one of 19 exemplary scholars chosen by the American Educational Research Association (AERA) as 2021 AERA Fellows.
Paul Morgan
Paul Morgan
It can be difficult to get young kids to eat enough vegetables, but a new Penn State study found that simply adding more veggies to their plates resulted in children consuming more vegetables at the meal.
Researchers working with Kathleen Keller find serving children a larger portion of vegetables appears to increase their vegetable intake.
When parents who are fighting with each other draw their adolescent children into their conflicts, the children may perceive those conflicts very differently than their parents, according to a new Penn State study.
According to a new study by Penn State researchers, triangulation may have a greater effect on children than parents realize.
The Mind & Life Service Award is given annually to a nominee who has provided recent service (within two years) based on the quantity and impact of their contributions to Mind & Life, as well as how well they exemplify Mind & Life values.
Robert Roeser
Robert Roeser
It is critical that we understand the impact of the public health response and correspondent stressors experienced by parents on the safety and wellbeing of children. Such information could provide invaluable insight into how to support vulnerable children and their families during the ongoing public health crises.
Christian Connell
Christian Connell