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2019-2020 Speaker Series

2019-2020 Speaker Series

Sy-Miin Chow

Sy-Miin Chow, Ph.D.

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Sy-Miin Chow

Sy-Miin Chow, Ph.D.

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies

Rick Gilmore

Rick Gilmore, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology

Rick Gilmore

Rick Gilmore, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology

Michael Hallquist, Ph.D.

Michael Hallquist, Ph.D.,

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Michael Hallquist, Ph.D.

Michael Hallquist, Ph.D.,

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Nilam Ram

Nilam Ram, Ph.D.

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, and Psychology

Nilam Ram

Nilam Ram, Ph.D.

Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, and Psychology

Mimi Brinberg, M.S.

Mimi Brinberg, M.S.

Graduate Student Researcher

Mimi Brinberg, M.S.

Mimi Brinberg, M.S.

Graduate Student Researcher

2019 PSU R Bootcamp

R Bootcamp is a three-day workshop for Penn State researchers and graduate students to provide a broad introduction to the use of the R programming language for social science research. Co-sponsors include the CSC’s Open Data and Developmental Science (ODDS) Research Initiative, as well as the Department of Psychology, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State’s Teaching and Learning with Technology, and the Social, Life, and Engineering Sciences Imaging Center. Following is a list of instructors:

Visit the webpage here.

Wednesday, August 21 – Friday, August 23, 2019
9:00 a.m.
210 & 211 Keller Building
Registration required

Child Maltreatment Solutions Network Annual Conference

“The Future of Foster Care: New Science to Address Old Problems”

Co-Sponsored by the Child Study Center

Monday, September 23, 2019, to Tuesday, September 24, 2019
8:00 a.m., Nittany Lion Inn

Katie Witkiewitz

Katie Witkiewitz, Ph.D.

Regent's Professor
Area Head: Quantitative/Methodology
Department of Psychology
The University of New Mexico

Katie Witkiewitz

Katie Witkiewitz, Ph.D.

Regent's Professor
Area Head: Quantitative/Methodology
Department of Psychology
The University of New Mexico

“Alcohol Harm Reduction is Health Promotion: A 15-year Journey Examining Patterns and Predictors of Alcohol Treatment Outcomes”

Abstract: Abstinence from alcohol is often viewed as the most desirable and ideal outcome for individuals with alcohol use disorder. Yet, most individuals with alcohol use disorder do not want to abstain from drinking and do not seek treatment. Several studies of treatment seeking and population-based non-treatment seeking samples have found that significant reductions in alcohol use during and following treatment, or over time in the absence of treatment, are common among individuals with alcohol use disorder. Reductions in drinking are associated with significant improvements in health, quality of life, and other consequences of alcohol use disorder, and also stable over time. Over the past 15 years, there have been several significant methodological advances in studying patterns and predictors of alcohol use and drinking reductions, yet most of the work has not had a major influence on clinical practice, and has had no effect on regulatory guidance for clinical trials examining new medications for alcohol use disorder in the United States. The current talk will provide a broad overview of this literature and present new data on the validity of World Health Organization drinking risk levels as a harm reduction endpoint. Results from several recent studies provide evidence that reductions in World Health Organization drinking risk levels are a viable alternative to abstinence as a harm reduction strategy and as an endpoint for alcohol clinical trials. The talk will also highlight the importance of drinking reductions as a significant public health priority.

Co-Sponsored with the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center

Dr. Witkiewitz is also presenting the BENNETT LECTURE

Tuesday, October 15, 2019
4:00 – 5:00 p.m., 110 Henderson/Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center Living Center

Wednesday, October 16, 2019
4:15 p.m., Memorial Lounge, Pasquerilla Spiritual Center

Monday, October 21, 2019, to Tuesday, October 22, 2019
8:15 a.m., Nittany Lion Inn

Kristina Olson

Kristina Olson, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology
University of Washington

Kristina Olson

Kristina Olson, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology
University of Washington

“Childhood Gender Diversity: Latest Findings and Current Controversies”

Abstract: Upon birth, doctors, midwives, and parents around the world declare, “It’s a boy,” or “It’s a girl.” Today, more and more children are defying these declarations, identifying as a gender that did not align with this pronouncement at their birth. Dr. Olson will present work exploring the gender development and well-being of this generation of transgender and gender-nonconforming children, suggesting ways in which their lives are both remarkably unique and surprisingly similar to their more gender-conforming peers. She will address questions about the continuity and discontinuity of identity, examine researcher biases in assessing gender, and discuss the implications of social support and transitioning on well-being in transgender and gender-diverse youth.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019
1:45 p.m., 127 Moore Building

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Kate Williams, Ph.D., Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Senior Research Fellow, Office of Education Research
Associate Professor, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education
"Behavioral Sleep Problems and Self-Regulation across Early Childhood"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Kate Williams, Ph.D., Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Senior Research Fellow, Office of Education Research
Associate Professor, School of Early Childhood and Inclusive Education
"Behavioral Sleep Problems and Self-Regulation across Early Childhood"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Michelle M. Garrison, Ph.D., University of Washington

Associate Professor, Health Services
Research Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
"Developing and Testing Family-Centered Sleep Interventions"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Michelle M. Garrison, Ph.D., University of Washington

Associate Professor, Health Services
Research Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
"Developing and Testing Family-Centered Sleep Interventions"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Maureen E. McQuillan, Ph.D., Indiana University

Clinical Psychology
"Maternal Stress, Sleep, and Parenting Across Toddlerhood: Implications for Child Adjustment"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Maureen E. McQuillan, Ph.D., Indiana University

Clinical Psychology
"Maternal Stress, Sleep, and Parenting Across Toddlerhood: Implications for Child Adjustment"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Douglas M. Teti, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Department Head
Professor of Health and Human Development, Psychology, and Pediatrics
"Sleep is a Family-Level Construct"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

Douglas M. Teti, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Department Head
Professor of Health and Human Development, Psychology, and Pediatrics
"Sleep is a Family-Level Construct"

CSC Innovation Hub Symposium 2020

“Family-Level Perspectives on Sleep and Self-Regulation in Early Childhood”

A symposium highlighting research on intervention, family sleep, and self-regulation.

View the presentation and slides here.
View the presentation only here.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Human Development and Family Studies

Tuesday, January 14, 2020
8:30 a.m. – Noon
Foster Auditorium, Pattee Library
Registration required

Rona Carter, Ph.D.

Rona Carter, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Michigan

Rona Carter, Ph.D.

Rona Carter, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Michigan

When They See Us: Interpersonal Experiences during the Pubertal Transition

Abstract: Pubertal development is a salient individual change for both the child experiencing it and the adults and peers in their immediate social environment.  In this talk, I will discuss how different aspects of puberty are related to shifts in interpersonal experiences during this developmental period. Specifically, how pubertal timing and tempo, seeing oneself as off-time, and the ways that adults and peers respond to pubertal growth contribute to changes in interpersonal relationships and experiences.

Thursday, February 20, 2020
4:15 p.m., Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library