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It really does take a village: The role of neighborhood in the etiology of child antisocial behavior

"It really does take a village: The role of neighborhood in the etiology of child antisocial behavior"

Abstract: There is now considerable evidence that neighborhood disadvantage predicts child antisocial behavior, and that this effect may be causal, at least to an extent.  However, the mechanisms underlying these contextual influences on child behavior remain unclear.  In this talk, I will examine gene-environment interplay as one key possibility, evaluating how structural characteristics of the neighborhood shape the etiology of child antisocial behavior.  The studies to be presented employed a number of state-of-the-science sampling, methodologic, and analytic techniques.  They were also designed to build upon one another, thereby allowing us to more fully explore the possibility of gene-environment interplay.  Results collectively provide compelling, if rather surprising, evidence regarding both 'bioecological gene-environment interactions' and passive gene-environment correlations.  Implications will be discussed.

Thursday, November 10, 2016 
4:15 p.m., 127 Moore Building